Wine Cellar Concepts


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 The Day

The Day, New London, Connecticut
September, 2006
"Upscale Clients, Downstairs Details: Renowned Builder
of Custom Wine Cellars Heads To New London" by Elaine Stoll
 When David Spon decided to relocate his McLean, Va., business called Wine Cellar Concepts, he spent eight years searching for a suitable city. The short list included Chicago, Seattle, Portland (ME) Portland (OR), and Santa Fe. Instead, Spon chose New London, which "really met and exceeded the expectations of what I was looking for," he says. Spon designs and installs custom, high-end wine cellars for the homes of serious wine collectors. He hopes to be up and running by mid-December at 46 Jefferson Ave., where his cabinetry designs will be manufactured and assembled by first two and eventually five local carpenters-cabinet makers Spon says he will hire.
   Spon designs and installs custom, high–end wine cellars for the homes of serious wine collectors. He hopes to be up and running by mid-December at 46 Jefferson Ave., where his cabinetry designs will be manufactured and assembled by first two and eventually five local carpenters-cabinet makers Spon says he will hire. In the business since 1988, Spon imagines — and his small staff creates — cabinetry crafted of American black walnut, American cherry, white oak and occasionally hard white maple and mahogany. The wood is lightly finished to emphasize its natural beauty.
   Spon designs the cabinetry to fit precisely the contours of each specific space — and the taste of his millionaire and billionaire clients. He plans both the cabinetry and the room around it, from lighting and floors to one–of–a–kind tasting tables and wall mosaics to the insulation and climatecontrol systems necessary for proper wine storage. He installs the cabinets himself and works with contractors who execute the other elements based on SponŐs specifications. The finished cellars are "lifestyle rooms" — not just functional wine racks but beautiful entertainment spaces, Spon says.


Washington Post

The Washington Post
May 22, 1991
"The Hot Topic of Proper Storage," by Ben Gilberti
 "Well-stored wines retain a core of youthful fruit. Mature, they somehow still taste fresh.
 "That is why a temperature-controlled and humidity-managed cellar is the dream of so many wine lovers. But building one can be a nightmare for the uninitiated, says David Spon, president of Wine Cellar Concepts, which has custom-built more than 200 wine cellars in the Washington area since 1988. 'The problem is that you've got to master lots of skilled trades in a very small space,' said Spon. 'There's electrical, plumbing, carpentry, insulation, vapor control, door fittings and sometimes more. And they all have to work together.'
 "A former horticulturist who entered the business part time before turning full-time pro, Spon learned mostly through trial and error. Problems he has encountered and solved include inadequate handling of exhaust air (which excessively heats up the surrounding room), condensation (which ruins redwood racking), too-small refrigeration units (manufacturers of the expensive cooling units seem to assume that you never open the cellar door), and units that run constantly (solution: use timers). He warns that these and other problems can crop up even on simple installations.' "



Washington Post

The Washington Times
November 19, 2003
"Reclaiming The Wine Cellar" by Jen Waters
 "The construction of the space ensures that the wine will be stored properly, says David Spon, owner of Wine Cellar Concepts in McLean. If a wine is stored well, it develops character that can be brought out when it is decanted. Mr. Spon specializes in designing high-end wine cellars for a minimum of 2,500 bottles with price tags of at least $50,000.
 "After meeting with a client to get an understanding of the intended use for the room, he develops a plan. Then he builds the shell for the room, creating the most complete vapor barrier possible, which helps maintain a humidity level between 55 percent and 75 percent. The proper humidity keeps mold from forming on the wine bottles' labels. It also keeps the corks moist.
 "'Laminate woods, such as plywood, shouldn't be used in a wine cellar because the higher humidity can make the glue melt. Soft woods, such as redwood and cedar, work better in the environment because they are naturally accustomed to the humidity and temperatures associated with a wine cellar.
 "'I think of it as the utimate guy's room,' Mr. Spon says. 'I have a handful of women clients . . . but it's like his fort. As a kid, you collected frogs or baseball cards; now you collect wine.'"